Partners That Heal

Vision

Partners That Heal envisions a world where its intervention techniques are offered routinely as an expansion to the conventional treatment protocol for disease, trauma and emotional distress.  

We fundamentally believe improvisation is a universal tool that can be used in any vulnerability situation. We empower those who are vulnerable by making ourselves vulnerable in playing improvisation games.


Meet Sage. Her mother, Brandy, watches from her chair in the corner, sunlight flooding the room. Brandy’s face mirrors that of her daughter—their eyes connect, smiles beaming brightly. Caroline, Kim and Brian, dancing and clapping at the foot of the bed, are doing what they have been trained to do: providing laughter and a sense of normalcy to Sage and her family.

Partners That Heal use improvisation and structured play to elevate mood and improve communication with individuals in a wide variety of care settings. Team members are specially trained to assess the individual qualities and needs of each person and create specific repertoire of improvisational interactions for them, making magic that helps soften hard edges and ease fear and pain. Partners That Heal help bridge trust and communication between individuals and their caregivers by creating shared memories that act as future points of conversation.

For more information about Partners That Heal, contact Pasha Yamotahari at 602.889.6304 or p.yamotahari@phoenixtheatre.com.


A mother of a young child with an inoperable brain tumor tells us:

“Thank you for working to bring joy to these children who need it so desperately and for taking some of that burden off the parents. The gift of interaction and caring is what these children really crave and, so often, organizations mistake that for wanting ‘things.’  We don't need more stuff - we need more compassion and laughter!”


“Partners That Heal allows the patient to be a child, allows a patient to feel “normal” again, sometimes for the last time. Their tools for healing aren’t medicines and treatments, but imagery, make-believe, and song. They strip away the shackles of the role of ‘patient,’ and allow these amazing kids to not just exist within the confines of their hospital room and illness, but to really live.”  - Child Life Specialist